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Beauty brands are utilizing everything from artificial intelligence (AI) to Augmented Reality to attract their customers in a fiercely competitive market. But whether these results work in new ways or not.

Last year, when L’Oreal said that it did not want to be the number 1 beauty firm in the world, but the number one tech company, it was clear at that time that things had changed in the industry.

“Beauty concerns for women are the same for 30 to 40 years,” says Gavio Baloch, global vice president of L’Oreal Technologies Incubator. But technology has made consumers more demanding.

“Now they want more personalized and just the right products and we have to obey them.”

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What are the major tech trends?

1. Personalization and artificial intelligence

Goa Baloch says ‘50% of women complain that they do not get the right color foundation for their face and darker women want them to get more versatility’.

They say bringing thousands of shades to the market will be of no use.

Lorem, a subsidiary of L’Oreal, has solved this problem in the form of a custom made foundation machine called Le Tent Practicular that promises to find the exact color of your skin.

These machines are available at sulfridge and heroids stores in the UK. Lincam consultants first test your skin color with a colorimeter which is a type of digital scanner.

These results are then put into a computer that has 20,000 different colors to choose from, using a specially designed algorithm.

Finally the results of this computer are sent to a machine that mixes the foundation for you, right there in the shop.

Baloch says, ‘It’s like mixing colors in a hardware store but the skin is much more complex.

The demand for personalized cosmetics is on the rise, according to market research firm Mintel. Almost half of consumers want their beauty product specially made for them, and one-third of consumers believe that such products produce better results.

But at £ 85, 30 milliliters of Le Tent speculator is not cheap. And some have warned that the cost of such cosmetics is not accessible to everyone.

‘It sends the message that you have to be rich to take advantage of the product,’ says Sharleen Low, a review editor at the US Technology Website & Gadget. Which is beyond comprehension. ‘

2. Virtual try on apps

As we grow more and more online shopping, beauty brands use this fast-paced reality to enhance their experience.

Improvements in image recognition and face recognition technology make these digital overlays more accurate.

Take Safora’s Virtual Artist, which lets your clients try thousands of colors of lipstick and eye shades on their smartphones or stores.

2. Virtual try on apps

As we grow more and more online shopping, beauty brands use this fast-paced reality to enhance their experience.

Improvements in image recognition and face recognition technology make these digital overlays more accurate.

Take Safora’s Virtual Artist, which lets your clients try thousands of colors of lipstick and eye shades on their smartphones or stores.

In today’s snap chat, when people put AR filters on their faces, it all seems fine.

Most people use them to experience new styles and styles, but they are also buying products through these apps.

3. Skin care smart devices

Do you rely on a computer to rate your skin? High Mirror, a ‘smart mirror’ created by Taiwan’s NewCompo Group, does just that.

Each time you log in it takes a picture of your face and scans it for wrinkles, spots, gums and glow levels.

Then it categorizes those things from good to bad and tells you about tips and products.

Ole also offers a similar smartphone service ‘Skin Advisor’. While using its new ‘Future You Simulation’ IR lets users know what their skin and face will look like in the future.

Some skin experts warn that such products can harm their self-esteem if their results are negative, without giving the user more information about their skin.

Lou says that light that is not well and can be easily fooled by residual makeup spots.

These rating scores do not always stay the same. And do we need a smart mirror to know if our skin is shiny or smooth? We can do it ourselves.

4. Printed makeup

Will we see robots doing our make-up? Some recently released gadgets suggest this may be possible.

Take Procter & Gamble (P&G) ‘s Opte Wand (stick), this make-up printer was shown at a display of electrical appliances this year in Las Vegas.

This stick reviews your skin and applies just the right amount of makeup to hide stains, blemishes, blood vessels, and other spots on the skin.

Its small camera captures 200 frames per second, while a microprocessor distinguishes between light and dark, keeping the data in view. Then a micro printer puts foundation on your skin.

P&G, which intends to launch this product by 2020, says that the printer estimates correctly that you need a small amount of serum, so people’s makeup bills should be low. ۔

Imagine where this trend will go. Design agency Seymour Paul has created a printer that allows you to download and print makeup looks online and put it on the face.

Facial analysis with 3D printing, facial recognition technology, and AI, will enable Alivebrands to sell influencers to make-up straight to the consumer.

5. 3D or e-makeup

In one of the latest beauty tech trends you don’t actually have to use real cosmetics.

Inspired by the popularity of Snapchat and AR filters on Instagram, the ‘Make Up’ artist lets you download make-up textures that enhance your digital footprint.

The most notable artists in this trend are Pearson Inies Martz, also known online as Inies Alpha. His creations have been praised by artists, musicians and models on Instagram.

They have also created a series of filters that anyone can download from Snap Chat.

The goal is to get more photos and videos shared and that’s why some of their digital creations have gone viral.

‘It can change the color of your skin, it can be 3D or even colorful,’ says Miss McDowall of Wag. Things that aren’t possible in real life. ‘

It goes along with the idea that everyone has a digital twin and you can play with it. ‘

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